shychemist

Anonymous asked:

Jokes on you and all of the 28k people who slammed me for that post about adventuresinchemistry and brainsx (and females in stem as a whole.) I'm a WOMAN. No, not a self-hating woman, I'm actually a proud feminist. I have nothing against women in stem, I just believe that you are royally fucking yourself over by choosing a time-consuming profession that's going to scare any real man away. Real men want families.But hey, it's your life. Have fun being alone- at least you'll have your test tubes.

shychemist answered:

I have no comment. None what so ever.

mintsharpie:

adventuresinchemistry:

smilesandvials:

dinostuck:

This is extremely ironic because one of the things my boyfriend loves about me is that I’m a scientist
And he fully supports me wanting to be a scientist AND us having a family in like 10 years

…Oh shit I totally didn’t know that all the children that my female professors have don’t exist and neither do their husbands.

Oh. Wait. 

Those are real people with real families.

(Also sounds like you *do* have something against women in STEM?)

Having a profession is time consuming by nature?
That is what a job does??
Most families don’t have only one working parent these days anyway?
I’m just…???

image

Jokes on you shitty anon, because while you seem to think that I represent all that is wrong with women in STEM (why else would you keep name checking me?) you also don’t seem to know that much about me.

Because even if having a demanding career in STEM did drive off the real men (why are they real? What do fake men look like? Aren’t all men by necessity real men?), which is doesn’t, I am totally 100% okay with that. I am not here for men of any kind. I am here for the science and the ladies, so there’s that.

"Feminist"

image

shychemist

Anonymous asked:

Jokes on you and all of the 28k people who slammed me for that post about adventuresinchemistry and brainsx (and females in stem as a whole.) I'm a WOMAN. No, not a self-hating woman, I'm actually a proud feminist. I have nothing against women in stem, I just believe that you are royally fucking yourself over by choosing a time-consuming profession that's going to scare any real man away. Real men want families.But hey, it's your life. Have fun being alone- at least you'll have your test tubes.

shychemist answered:

I have no comment. None what so ever.

naughtywheniwannabe:

You’re clearly not a feminist if you don’t believe that women should be able to have a “real man” and a career. The basis of feminism is equality for all genders meaning if you’re a woman who wants a family and a career in STEM fine good for you or if you’re a man who wants a family and a career in nursing or childcare good go for it. You are completely mistaking with what feminism is and any “real man” would want a woman who can stand on her own.

smilesandvials
classicethnichistoricalvibez:

In 1947, Dr. Marie Daly became the first African-American woman to earn a Ph.D. in Chemistry when she graduated from Columbia University. A trailblazer in the field of biochemistry, Dr. Daly researched the connection between high cholesterol and heart disease. #WomenInSTEM (Photo courtesy of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, D. Samuel Gottesman Library Archives)
Click to see source of picture

classicethnichistoricalvibez:

In 1947, Dr. Marie Daly became the first African-American woman to earn a Ph.D. in Chemistry when she graduated from Columbia University. A trailblazer in the field of biochemistry, Dr. Daly researched the connection between high cholesterol and heart disease. #WomenInSTEM (Photo courtesy of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, D. Samuel Gottesman Library Archives)

Click to see source of picture

scinerds
unapproachableblackchicks:


On Gender Norms and Young Black Girls
JULY 7, 2014BYCIARA MYERS, EDITOR 1 COMMENT
By Riki WilchinsTrueChildhttp://www.truechild.org
Riki Wilchins is the Executive Director at TrueChild, an organization that aids donors, policy-makers and practitioners in reconnecting race, class and gender through “gender transformative” approaches challenging rigid gender norms and inequities. Wilchins has authored three books on gender theory and has appeared in a number of anthologies and publications on the subject. Her work has led her to be profiled by The New York Times, and she was once selected as one of Time Magazine’s “100 Civic Innovators for the 21st Century.” Here, Wilchins discusses what we can do to correct the effects of gender norms on young, black girls.
Decades of researchhas found that challenging harmful gender norms are a key to improving life outcomes for at-risk communities.
For instance, young women who internalize narrow feminine ideals that prioritize motherhood, dependence, vulnerability and appearance have lower life outcomes in reproductive health, education and economic empowerment.
Major international donor agencies like PEPFAR, USAID, UNAIDs, and WHO have all implemented “gender transformative” initiatives that challenge traditional gender norms, and found them effective (an introductory paper is here).
Gender impacts every issue funders address; yet donors and grantees are seldom challenged to do innovative work around gender.
As a senior program officer put it, “My staff and grantees get race and class, but where’s the gender analysis? What I want to know is—what happened to gender?”
Part of the answer to her question may lie in new report onyoung Black girlswe conducted for the Heinz Endowments.
We found that Black adolescent girls and young women face special barriers related to both race and gender which have immense effects on their health, achievement and life outcomes. And this was especially true for low-income Black girls, who also have challenges associated with poverty.
First, Black girls’ unique race and gendered experiences of discrimination result in multiple stresses that – over time – impair their immune systems.
Also, they must navigate social hostilities based on race as well as pressures to conform to traditional feminine ideals and those specific to Black communities.
Moreover, feminine norms in the Black community often prioritize caretaking and self-sacrifice. Black girls may be silently encouraged to focus on others’ health while ignoring signals of pain and illness until their own bodies are in crisis.
The additive impact of these stresses can produce a “weathering effect,” in which Black women’s bodies become physically and biologically vulnerable, resulting in high rates of chronic disorders, reproductive health problems, infant mortality and obesity.



Download the report here

unapproachableblackchicks:

On Gender Norms and Young Black Girls


By Riki Wilchins
TrueChild
http://www.truechild.org

Riki Wilchins is the Executive Director at TrueChild, an organization that aids donors, policy-makers and practitioners in reconnecting race, class and gender through “gender transformative” approaches challenging rigid gender norms and inequities. Wilchins has authored three books on gender theory and has appeared in a number of anthologies and publications on the subject. Her work has led her to be profiled by The New York Times, and she was once selected as one of Time Magazine’s “100 Civic Innovators for the 21st Century.” Here, Wilchins discusses what we can do to correct the effects of gender norms on young, black girls.


Decades of researchhas found that challenging harmful gender norms are a key to improving life outcomes for at-risk communities.

For instance, young women who internalize narrow feminine ideals that prioritize motherhood, dependence, vulnerability and appearance have lower life outcomes in reproductive health, education and economic empowerment.

Major international donor agencies like PEPFAR, USAID, UNAIDs, and WHO have all implemented “gender transformative” initiatives that challenge traditional gender norms, and found them effective (an introductory paper is here).

Gender impacts every issue funders address; yet donors and grantees are seldom challenged to do innovative work around gender.

As a senior program officer put it, “My staff and grantees get race and class, but where’s the gender analysis? What I want to know is—what happened to gender?”

Part of the answer to her question may lie in new report onyoung Black girlswe conducted for the Heinz Endowments.

We found that Black adolescent girls and young women face special barriers related to both race and gender which have immense effects on their health, achievement and life outcomes. And this was especially true for low-income Black girls, who also have challenges associated with poverty.

First, Black girls’ unique race and gendered experiences of discrimination result in multiple stresses that – over time – impair their immune systems.

Also, they must navigate social hostilities based on race as well as pressures to conform to traditional feminine ideals and those specific to Black communities.

Moreover, feminine norms in the Black community often prioritize caretaking and self-sacrifice. Black girls may be silently encouraged to focus on others’ health while ignoring signals of pain and illness until their own bodies are in crisis.

The additive impact of these stresses can produce a “weathering effect,” in which Black women’s bodies become physically and biologically vulnerable, resulting in high rates of chronic disorders, reproductive health problems, infant mortality and obesity.

Download the report here

doctorwho
doctorwho:

doctorwho:

mtv:

nominee 4 of 6
like or reblog this post to vote doctor who for best fandom forever!
scope out all the other nominees and see who’s in the lead. then watch the mtvU fandom awards on sunday, july 27 at 8/7c on mtv to see which o.g. fandom takes the crown!

Hello Whovians!
Isn’t this fantastic? We’ve all been nominated for mtvU’s Best Fandom Forever award alongside some other amazing fandoms like Batman and Lord of the Rings. As mentioned in the post, this is an award for the best fandom, which means that this nomination is about you. From the gif makers to the artists, the text posters to the casual watchers, all of you are the reason why we’ve all been nominated, and why we get to do all of the fun stuff we do every day here on Doctor Who Tumblr. For that, we thank you!

Like or reblog to vote for Doctor Who, and good luck to all of the other nominees.

Hello, Whovians. We’re currently in second place behind Harry Potter and the competition for Best Fandom Forever ends tonight at 9pm EST! 

doctorwho:

doctorwho:

mtv:

nominee 4 of 6

like or reblog this post to vote doctor who for best fandom forever!

scope out all the other nominees and see who’s in the lead. then watch the mtvU fandom awards on sunday, july 27 at 8/7c on mtv to see which o.g. fandom takes the crown!

Hello Whovians!

Isn’t this fantastic? We’ve all been nominated for mtvU’s Best Fandom Forever award alongside some other amazing fandoms like Batman and Lord of the Rings. As mentioned in the post, this is an award for the best fandom, which means that this nomination is about you. From the gif makers to the artists, the text posters to the casual watchers, all of you are the reason why we’ve all been nominated, and why we get to do all of the fun stuff we do every day here on Doctor Who Tumblr. For that, we thank you!

Like or reblog to vote for Doctor Who, and good luck to all of the other nominees.

Hello, Whovians. We’re currently in second place behind Harry Potter and the competition for Best Fandom Forever ends tonight at 9pm EST!